Tag Archives: independent bookstore

Exclusive from Forthcoming Novel

19 Mar

 

New chapter

La Muse Press will publish new work from Mary B. Banks. She is working on two books that are page turners. One is about the Apocalypse; the other one is about a teenage girl living in Harlem. Here is a teaser from one of her manuscripts:

God’s children were under a vicious, ugly, nasty, horrific, gut-wrenching, dirty, deadly, demonic curse that gave them horrendous nightmares. These dreams were so frightening that some of the townspeople hadn’t slept in days. The citizens of Futuria warded off sleep preferring insomnia. Dark half-moons were underneath their bloodshot red eyes. They preferred sleepless nights rather than seeing those diabolical images, horrifying sounds, and God-awful smells.

Those who did not sleep looked like dazed sleepwalkers. Their movements were sluggish and pitiful. They slurred their words and nodded off and then wake up suddenly. For those who did succumb to sleepiness, they tried their best to sleep during the day because the night brought its own evilness and wickedness. Yet, there were those who slept during the night. Legs thrashing, kicking bed sheets off the bed, and fighting the dream’s adversaries.

Want to read some of Mary B. Banks’ work right now?

La Muse Press has you covered. Pick up Street Magic: Stories and Tales. It is is available at Amazon.com and two indie bookshops in Baltimore, MD: Normal’s Bookstore (425 E 31st St) and Expressions (222 N Paca St).

 

The Independent Bookstore

26 May
Street Magic is now at Atomic Books for $12!  

If you’re an indie publisher or self-published author, the independent bookstore should be your best friend. Unlike the “super chain bookstores” such as Barnes and Noble and Borders, authors and publishers can approach the bookstore owner about carrying his/her books usually through a consignment agreement. With a consignment agreement, you receive a percentage of the book sales–the books aren’t bought alright. For example, Street Magic: Stories and Tales now available at Atomic Books (see photograph at left), located in the Hampden area of Baltimore. When I saw Street Magic on the table with the other fiction books, I felt so proud…but just because your book is in a bookstore, you still need to promote your book, which is very challenging and arduous. Your book is competing with bestselling authors who are signed with major publishing conglomerates (Simon & Schuster, Hachette, Penquin, HarperCollins, and Random House) who can shell out the big bucks to market their products. Even though you might not have thousands of dollars to spend on advertising, publicity is free. Contact editors of your local magazines and newspapers. Get the word out about your book, before it is officially released. Most publications such as Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Review want to receive galleys or manuscripts. However, I noticed that most of the national trade publications do not accept work from self-published authors, but don’t let that stop you. If you want to self-publish your book, make sure you hire an editor to ensure your writing is grammatical and error-free. Hire a book designer to typeset your book interior and design your book cover. If you have an unappealing, poorly design book cover, the average person will skip over your book. The road of an independent author is a long one, but it can be worth it–only if you strategize and know the rules of the publishing game. And don’t throw in the towel, even if the fat lady is singing.